My Disillusionment of Russia

Release Date
January 1, 1923
Author
Emma Goldman
Published
1923
Publisher
Doubleday, Page & Company

I found this read highly fascinating and also informative to the issues we are facing in today’s time. People have a belief that communism or bolshevism is somehow in anyway a good thing is absolutely nuts. Just take it from Emma (who is not so much different than the BLM marxist captain, Susan Rosenberg).

For those not familiar with this writer, Emma Goldman (June 27 [O.S. June 15], 1869 – May 14, 1940) was an anarchist, political activist and an author. Emma and her lover, Alexander Berkman were both a key developers of the rise in anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century.

Born in Kaunas, Russian Empire (now Lithuania) to a Jewish family, Goldman emigrated to the United States in 1885. Attracted to anarchism after the Chicago Haymarket affair 1The Haymarket affair (also known as the Haymarket massacre, the Haymarket riot, or the Haymarket Square riot) was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor demonstration on May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago. It began as a peaceful rally in support of workers striking for an eight-hour work day, the day after police killed one and injured several workers. An unknown person threw a dynamite bomb at the police as they acted to disperse the meeting, and the bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of seven police officers and at least four civilians; dozens of others were wounded. In the internationally publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy. The evidence was that one of the defendants may have built the bomb, but none of those on trial had thrown it. Seven were sentenced to death and one to a term of 15 years in prison. Illinois Governor Richard J. Oglesby commuted two of the sentences to terms of life in prison; another committed suicide in jail rather than face the gallows. The other four were hanged on November 11, 1887. In 1893, Illinois Governor John Peter Altgeld (The first democratic governor of Illinois (<–You can’t make this shit up!) pardoned the remaining defendants and criticized the trial., Goldman became a writer and lecturer on anarchist philosophy, women’s rights, and social justice issues yet she is more popularly known for what she and anarchist writer Alexander Berkman, her lover, planned to do. They attempted to assassinate an industrialist and financier, Henry Clay Frick as an act of propaganda. Frick was fortunate to survive the attempt on his life in 1892, and Berkman was sentenced to 22 years in prison while Emma was a little more fortunate. Unfortunately for her, Goldman was imprisoned several times in the years that followed, for “inciting to riot” and illegally distributing information about birth control.

In 1917, Goldman and Berkman were sentenced to two years in jail for conspiring to “induce persons not to register” for the newly instated draft. After their release from prison, they were arrested—along with 248 others—in the so-called Palmer Raids during the First Red Scare and deported to Russia. Initially supportive of that country’s October Revolution that brought the Bolsheviks to power, Goldman changed her mind pretty quickly once she reached the Bolshevik controlled ‘Mother Russia‘.

I suggest those whom hold these beliefs that communism or socialism is a good thing to read this book as it may give you a hard dose of reality just as good ol’ Emma had.

Footnotes

  • 1
    The Haymarket affair (also known as the Haymarket massacre, the Haymarket riot, or the Haymarket Square riot) was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor demonstration on May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago. It began as a peaceful rally in support of workers striking for an eight-hour work day, the day after police killed one and injured several workers. An unknown person threw a dynamite bomb at the police as they acted to disperse the meeting, and the bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of seven police officers and at least four civilians; dozens of others were wounded. In the internationally publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy. The evidence was that one of the defendants may have built the bomb, but none of those on trial had thrown it. Seven were sentenced to death and one to a term of 15 years in prison. Illinois Governor Richard J. Oglesby commuted two of the sentences to terms of life in prison; another committed suicide in jail rather than face the gallows. The other four were hanged on November 11, 1887. In 1893, Illinois Governor John Peter Altgeld (The first democratic governor of Illinois (<–You can’t make this shit up!) pardoned the remaining defendants and criticized the trial.